Monday, 22 May 2017

Latest River Dredging Pics at The Weir on the Bandon River

Here are the latest photos of the river dredging works along the Bandon River. Below are pictures of the Weir situated in Bandon town where heavy machinery and rock breakers are removing rock and gravel from the river bed.  

Artist impression of the Weir in Bandon town









Thursday, 4 May 2017

Dredging Begins on the Bandon River

Weekly Publication in Southern Star Saturday May 6th 2017 (Click to Enlarge)











Tuesday, 21 March 2017

The Demise of Loch Maree


What has occurred across the west coast of Scotland over the last few decades is nothing short of a travesty. We have been responsible for the systematic demise of a great natural resource, decimating the wild populations of salmon and sea-trout in order to support big business in farmed salmon.

In the case of the river Ewe and Loch Maree system, the installation of a fish farm in Loch Ewe correlated with the decline of what was once the worlds premier destination for sea-trout in the world. Not only have we lost the sea-trout, but almost all the jobs its supported. This is the story of the demise of Loch Maree.

This film was commissioned by Salmon and Trout Conservation Scotland

For more information visit: salmon-troutscotland.org

Summer Salmon on the Fly

Fly fishing for salmon on the Bandon River, Ireland. First fish is colored weighing 10Ib and released. Kept the second fish a fresh sea-liced salmon just up from the sea weighing 7Ib

Sunday, 5 March 2017

A call to ban pair-trawling in estuaries as a first step to protecting the marine environment

Padraic Fogarty campaign officer for the Irish Wildlife Trust and editor of 'Irish Wildlife' magazine published the following article for the latest publication of INSHORE IRELAND 2017 on why we need to ban pair trawling in our shallow inshore waters

Click image to enlarge article

Click to Enlarge

Friday, 24 February 2017

Council risks EU fines for not building 'fish path' to aid migrating salmon at River Blackwater

Wednesday, February 22, 2017 Irish Examiner 
http://www.irishexaminer.com/ireland/council-risks-eu-fines-for-not-building-fish-path-to-aid-migrating-salmon-at-river-blackwater-443478.html

Hefty EU fines could be imposed on Cork County Council which hasn’t the money to build a ‘fish path’ for migrating salmon. A hands-on approach to dealing with migrating salmon may be needed again this year it is feared. The salmon need help getting over a weir because the fish path has been destroyed.

It’s estimated it will cost in the region of €2m to purchase land and build a new fish path at the River Blackwater weir in Fermoy town.

The council is writing to the Department of Communications, Energy and Natural Resources seeking the €2m needed.

It also has to cap the weir and put in protective boulders to prevent it from again being damaged by trees which were swept downriver in previous floods. The council has enough money to do that, but not buy land and install the fish path.

The issue was raised at a meeting of the council’s Northern Division in Mallow by Fermoy-based Cllr Noel McCarthy. He said last October people, waded into the river to physically pick up salmon and take them to the upstream side of the weir.

Cllr McCarthy said it was believed that fish which weren’t picked up died: “I’ve met several people who are very concerned that this will happen again this year. We need to speed up the process and make sure there are no more delays in getting this work done. It’s totally unacceptable.” “We were told at one stage that we could face fines from the EU if this work isn’t done. We were also told originally that Lagan (contractors) would do the work as part the flood relief scheme,” said Cllr Frank O’Flynn who added that he knows a landowner who is anxious to sell the land needed for the fish path.

Council officials said they are in negotiation with a landowner and their legal department is progressing the transfer. However, they admit that they don’t have the money to pay for this part of the project and are in behind the scenes negotiations with the Department of Communications, Energy and Natural Resources.

“The structure of the weir is compromised. Capping must be done and their funding in place for that. This work could be progressed in the coming year,” one council official said. It had been hoped that capping would be undertaken in conjunction with the building of the fish path.

But assistant county manager James Fogarty said this couldn’t happen.

Councillors then agreed to write to the Department of Communications, Energy and Natural Resources asking it to immediately release the €2m for the project.